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TV010
Long-term growth, mortality and regeneration of trees in permanent vegetation plots in the Pacific Northwest, 1910 to present

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David Carl Shaw
ORIGINATOR: Jerry F. Franklin
OTHER RESEARCHER: Robert J. Pabst, Charles B. Halpern, Janneke HilleRisLambers, Andrew J. Larson, James A. Lutz, Mark E. Swanson, James A. Freund, Paul A. Harcombe, Todd M. Wilson, Kenneth J. Bible, Julia A. Jones
DATA SET CONTACT PERSON: Robert J. Pabst, Suzanne M. Remillard
METADATA CONTACT: Donald L. Henshaw
FORMER INVESTIGATOR: Thornton T. Munger, Mark E. Harmon, Steven A. Acker, Kari B. O'Connell, Howard Bruner, Sarah E. Greene, C. Ted Dyrness, Richard E. Brainerd
METADATA CREATION DATE:
14 Aug 2001
MOST RECENT METADATA REVIEW DATE:
6 Mar 2013
KEYWORDS:
Disturbance, Spatial data, Organic matter, stand structure, Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER), forest dynamics, measurements, productivity, biomass, plant properties, wind, community composition, plant species composition, spatial properties, long term, permanent plots, succession, primary production, plant growth, mortality, regeneration, disease, disturbance, woody debris, organic matter, ecosystems, forests, old growth forests, trees, windthrow
PURPOSE:
The study purpose is to examine long-term trends and dynamics of representative forest types in the Pacific Northwest. The study provides baseline information on long-term rates of tree growth and tree regeneration (ingrowth), causes and characteristics of tree mortality, forest productivity and biomass, and spatial patterns (demography) of ingrowth and mortality. Long-term observations are the only direct means to document and understand the slow changes of our forests which are dominated by long-lived trees species (individuals commonly live 400 to 1000 years). Long-term observations can quantify levels and dynamics of natural forest structures to be used as guides in ecosystem management. Long-term observations provide the definitive measure of long-term productivity and, thus, sustainable harvest levels. Long-term observations also provide a basis for monitoring effects of global climatic change as well as other changes.
METHODS:
Experimental Design - TV010:
Description:

The sites were selected subjectively to represent modal examples of the major habitat types in the H.J. Andrews area (usually with a mature and old growth example). Some stands (e.g.riparian) were selected for other reasons. The stands are remeasured at 5 to 10 year intervals to provide growth and regeneration information.

Field Methods - TV010 :
Description:

The stands are surveyed into 25 X 25 slope corrected subplots marked with permanent stakes. All trees greater than the minimum size (usually 5 cm dbh) are tagged, diametered, vigor coded, and mapped. The mapping is done using a 5 X 5 m grid formed with string as a guide. See attached sheet for details.

TAXONOMIC SYSTEM:
Garrison et al., 1976
GEOGRAPHIC EXTENT:
Primarily the Pacific Northwest (OR, WA); additional plots in other western states (CA, WY, CO).
ELEVATION_MINIMUM (meters):
ELEVATION_MAXIMUM (meters):
MEASUREMENT FREQUENCY:
1-6 years
PROGRESS DESCRIPTION:
Active
UPDATE FREQUENCY DESCRIPTION:
asNeeded
CURRENTNESS REFERENCE:
Ground condition