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SS006
H.J. Andrews Forest Discovery Trail: An interpretation of place based on curriculum of interpretive learning trail and field trip support, 2016

CREATOR: Lissy Goralnik, Kari B. O'Connell
PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kari B. O'Connell
ORIGINATOR: Lissy Goralnik
OTHER RESEARCHER: Sarah Minette Kelly, Mark D Schulze, Michael P. Nelson
METADATA CONTACT: Sarah Minette Kelly
MOST RECENT METADATA REVIEW DATE:
19 Feb 2020
KEYWORDS:
education, human dimensions, public assessments, forest ecology, forest ecosystems
METHODS:
Experimental Design - SS006:
Description: The Discovery Trail was developed in 2011 as a place for visitors (~1800 in 2014) to explore the forest and site research themes from HJA headquarters, but it is not yet amenable to unguided educational exploration. We have designed an interpretive learning trail and field trip support framework for the Discovery Trail. Our primary objective is to educate students about place while guiding them to reflect upon their own relationships with place and personal responsibility for stewardship behavior. Long-term place-based conservation research is woven with creative writing from the HJA writer’s residency program and paired with reflection and creative inquiry. Interactive trail stops enable students to engage the forest from multiple perspectives. The Discovery Trail is wired for intranet wifi and content and assessment will be delivered by digital media (i.e. iPads). We will evaluate conceptual learning according to the Framework for the Next Generation Science Standards, as well as observe affective changes in sense of place, empowerment, and expressions of care or empathy through analysis of student responses to the trail activities.
Field Methods - SS006:
Description: In June 2016 we launched a pilot field test of the Discovery Trail curriculum. Because the iPad application was not yet built, we used Powerpoint content delivery and paper handouts for student responses and assessment. Thirty upper-level high school students from Sisters, Oregon participated on the trail in groups of 3. Each group shared an iPad and participated in as many of the 10 Discovery Trail stops as they could in the allotted timeframe (about 90 minutes on trail); most groups completed 4-5 stops. Students also individually filled out a feedback form when they completed the trail activity to comment on the logistics and content of the trail learning activity. We also conducted a final group assessment, for which the students worked in small groups to fill out a questionnaire and draw a large format picture to share their qualitative experience on the trail. All of this data will be used to make the trail more effective for the anticipated 3 school groups who will visit the trail in Fall 2016 and 3 groups in Spring 2017.
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION:
Pilot data collected June 2016; next data collection planned for Fall 2016 and Spring 2017. External Funding: H.J. Andrews Discovery Trail: An Interpretation of Place. The Mountaineer’s Foundation. With Mark Schulze and Kari O’Connell. $3000. Funded.
TAXONOMIC SYSTEM:
None
MEASUREMENT FREQUENCY:
seasonally
PROGRESS DESCRIPTION:
Active
UPDATE FREQUENCY DESCRIPTION:
asNeeded
CURRENTNESS REFERENCE:
Ground condition
RELATED MATERIAL:

Related Presentations:

"HJ Andrews Forest Discovery: Interdisciplinary Interpretation and Empathy Development," 2016. With K.B. O’Connell and M. Schulz. 20-minute presentation at the Association for Experiential Education (AESS) Conference, Session moderator. Washington DC, June 2016.

"HJ Andrews Forest Discovery: A Conceptual Framework for Interdisciplinary Interpretation," 2015. With K.B. O’Connell, M. Schulz, and M.P. Nelson. 20-minute presentation at the Symposium for Experiential Education Research (SEER) in Portland, OR. October 2015.

"Forest Discovery: Crosscutting Concepts and Environmental Responsibility in the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest. An Interpretive Learning Trail Conceptual Framework," 2015. With K.B. O’Connell, M. Schulz, and M.P. Nelson. Poster presentation at the Association for Environmental Studies and Sciences (AESS) conference, San Diego, CA. June 2015.